Adult Actress Jessica Drake Accuses Trump Of Sexual Misconduct — CBS Sacramento

An Adult Actress, George Soros has more money than sense! I wonder how much he paid her for this stunt?

Arlin Report

Adult film actress Jessica Drake became the 11th woman to publicly accuse Donald Trump of sexual misconduct Saturday, according to Reena Flores of CBS News.

via Adult Actress Jessica Drake Accuses Trump Of Sexual Misconduct — CBS Sacramento

Allred keeps digging up trash……her latest has sex on film for pay.   What else does she do for pay?   Lies for money?

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Bobcats, cougars, and coyotes get a stay of execution in Nevada

Wildlife Services will stop killing predators in Nevada’s wilderness areas, thanks to a lawsuit

BLM has discretion on removing excess wild horses from public lands – 10th Circuit (They must not have seen the movie Hidalgo)


(They must not have seen the movie Hidalgo)

Wild horses, file 2014. REUTERS Jim Urquhart

10/12/16 REUTERS LEGAL 10:00:01


Copyright (c) 2016 Thomson Reuters

October 12, 2016

BLM has discretion on removing excess wild horses from public lands – 10th Circuit

David Bailey

(Reuters) – A U.S. appeals court on Tuesday rejected a Wyoming lawsuit that demanded the federal government remove hundreds of wild horses from herd management areas in the state where populations exceeded established limits.

Siding with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and three conservation groups, the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals found the federal agency has discretion to decide whether removal is required where wild horse populations reach above appropriate management levels.

Wyoming argued the BLM had a nondiscretionary duty under the U.S. Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act to remove horses from seven herd management areas, or HMAs, in the state where 2014 populations undisputably exceeded limits.

The state said the setting of an appropriate management limit on horse populations represented a scientific determination of the ecological balance in the management area, requiring the BLM to gather wild horses where those limits were exceeded.

”Contrary to the state’s argument, a determination that an overpopulation exists in a given HMA is not sufficient, standing alone, to trigger any duty on the part of the BLM,” Judge Mary Beck Briscoe wrote for the court.

Bill Eubanks, who represented the American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign, the Cloud Foundation and Return to Freedom groups that intervened in support of the BLM, said the decision has implications throughout the American West.

”The appellate court has clearly affirmed two important issues – first that wild horse populations in excess of the BLM’s arbitrarily established ‘appropriate’ management levels do not equate with overpopulation, and second that the BLM is not required to remove wild horses from the range even if it determines an overpopulation exists,” Eubanks said.

A representative of the Wyoming attorney general’s Office could not be reached immediately for comment.

Wyoming in August 2014 demanded BLM remove horses from seven herd management areas where populations exceeded appropriate management levels. BLM responded in November 2014 that it had not yet determined whether removal was necessary and it would consider Wyoming’s requests along with horse management needs across the western United States still in planning.

In December 2014, Wyoming filed a petition for review with the federal court in Wyoming, arguing BLM failed in a mandatory nondiscretionary duty to manage the horses.

A federal judge in Wyoming dismissed the case in April 2015, finding BLM had wide latitude to decide when it is necessary to remove wild horses from public lands. Wyoming appealed. The case was argued in the Circuit Court three weeks ago.

The panel of Briscoe, Judge Monroe McKay and Judge Scott Matheson said the act does not define “appropriate management level,” equate it with any requirement to remove excess animals from an area or obligate BLM to make an immediate determination on removal.

The statute requires determination both of an excess population and that removal of excess animals is necessary. And although it was undisputed there was an overpopulation of horses, BLM had not decided whether removal was necessary, Briscoe said.

The case is Wyoming v. U.S. Department of the Interior, 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, No. 15-8041.

For the petitioner-appellant Wyoming: Michael McGrady, senior assistant attorney general, Wyoming

For the respondent-appellees: Allen Brabender and Alison Finnegan, U.S. Justice Department Environment & Natural Resources Division

For intervenor-appellees: William Eubanks and Katherine Meyer of Meyer Glitzenstein & Eubanks

—- Index References —-

News Subject: (Forecasts (1FO11); Government Litigation (1GO18); Judicial Cases & Rulings (1JU36); Legal (1LE33); Population Demographics (1PO77))

Industry: (Veterinary Services (1VE79))

Region: (Americas (1AM92); North America (1NO39); U.S. West Region (1WE46); USA (1US73); Wyoming (1WY84))

Language: EN

Other Indexing: (Alison Finnegan; Allen Brabender; Jim Urquhart; Jim UrquhartWild; Michael McGrady; Scott Matheson; Katherine Meyer; Bill Eubanks; William Eubanks; Monroe McKay; Mary Beck Briscoe)

Keywords: energy (MCC:OEC); (N2:US); (N2:AMERS); (N2:NAMER); (N2:USA); (MCCL:OVR)

Word Count: 598



Georgia judge faces renewed ethics scrutiny after journalist’s charges dropped

Georgia judge faces renewed ethics scrutiny after journalist’s charges dropped

July 8th, 2016 by Tyler Jett in Local Regional News Read Time: 5 mins.

Fannin Focus Publisher Mark Thomason, who was arrested…

Photo by Contributed Photo /Times Free Press.

Appalachian Judicial Circuit District Attorney Alison Sosebee dropped…

Photo by Contributed Photo /Times Free Press.

Now that the criminal charges against a North Georgia journalist have been dropped, the questions he originally raised about his local government are back in the forefront.

Fannin Focus Publisher Mark Thomason, who was arrested last month after seeking bank account documents through a subpoena and open records request, said Thursday he intends to continue pursuing the information. In particular, he wonders why Superior Court Judge Brenda Weaver used public money to fund a private civil lawsuit against his newspaper, and why local county commissioners have no oversight of her account.

“We’ll see where this leads,” Thomason said Thursday, hours after Appalachian Judicial Circuit District Attorney Alison Sosebee said she would not prosecute him despite a grand jury indictment.

Sosebee wrote in a court motion that she was declining to prosecute Thomason or his attorney at the request of Weaver, the alleged victim in the case. Weaver, meanwhile, told Sosebee in a letter Wednesday that she felt the district attorney had more pressing criminal cases to worry about than the one against Thomason.

In the same letter, Weaver continued to attack Thomason’s credibility.

“As a public official,” she wrote, “I must expect not only false reporting in newspaper articles and television (which I have always understood), but I should ignore even blatant false allegations made in written emails to county commissioners.”

At the request of Weaver, Sosebee presented a case to a grand jury on June 24 against Thomason and his attorney, Russell Stookey. The grand jury returned indictments against the two on counts of identity fraud and attempted identity fraud, saying that Thomason and Stookey attempted to get into Weaver’s account, which they believe to be off limits.

The grand jury also indicted Thomason on a count of making a false statement for a records request he sent to Pickens County earlier this month, in which he asked for checks sent to Weaver’s account that he believed were “cashed illegally.” After Thomason’s and Stookey’s arrest last month, First Amendment and journalism foundations demanded that Sosebee drop the charges.

Origins of the case

The dispute between Thomason and Weaver started more than a year ago, with a different controversy. In March 2015, Superior Court Judge Roger Bradley told a story from the bench during a hearing in Fannin County Superior Court about a man he used to know named “[n-word] Bob.”

Thomason wrote about Bradley’s statement. A month later, when court reporter Rhonda Stubblefield released a transcript of the hearing, Thomason wrote a second article questioning the accuracy of Stubblefield’s transcript. He said other witnesses in the courtroom reported that members of the Fannin County Sheriff’s Office also used the racial slur, though those statements did not appear in Stubblefield’s transcript.

Thomason filed an open records request for Stubblefield’s audio recording of that court hearing. Stubblefield declined the request. Thomason then hired Stookey and filed a court motion, demanding the audio under the Open Records Act. A judge from outside the Appalachian Judicial Circuit listened to the audio and declined Thomason’s request, saying the recording did not suggest Stubblefield’s transcript was inaccurate.

Stubblefield, in turn, filed a $1.6 million libel lawsuit against Thomason, though she later dropped the case.

In November, Weaver wrote a letter to county commissioners, informing them that she was going to use her publicly funded operating account to pay for Stubblefield’s legal expenses, which came to about $17,000. Stubblefield is not a county employee, and her legal fees are not covered by county insurance.

“People may agree or disagree as far as the payment of it,” Weaver said during a Fannin County Tea Party Patriots meeting in February. “She had done absolutely nothing wrong. The court reporters are not required to have any insurance. I just did not think it was fair to her. We judges talked about it, to bear the expense of that.”

After the meeting, Thomason filed an open records request with Weaver, asking for the checks she had sent to Stubblefield’s lawyer.

“The judicial branch is not considered a ‘government agency’ for the purpose of the Open Records Act,” Weaver wrote back on Feb. 12, declining his request.

Last month, after Stubblefield’s lawyer argued in court that Thomason should actually have to pay for her attorney’s fees instead of county taxpayers, Thomason and Stookey subpoenaed Weaver’s operating account. Thomason also filed the records request with Pickens County, asking for checks they had sent Weaver for her account.

Sosebee, who served as Weaver’s clerk in 2001 and later worked in the law practice of Weaver’s husband, then sought criminal charges against Thomason.

County funds

The money for Weaver’s operating account comes from the local governments of Fannin, Gilmer and Pickens counties, or at least some of it does. Fannin County Finance Director Rita Davis-Kirby said Weaver’s account may also contain money from the state government, though it’s not the county’s business to know about Weaver’s funds.

“Once we release our quarterly payment to the judges,” she said, “they’re free to use that money however they see fit.”

Fannin County Commission Chairman Bill Simonds said the counties give Weaver money for her operating account four times a year and let her use it without oversight. He said that is standard practice in Georgia, pointing out that Whitfield County does the same thing.

But Whitfield County Administrator Mark Gibson said that is not true. He said judges present budget proposals to the county commissioners, with a breakdown of how the money will be spent. The commissioners then decide whether to award the judge the money he or she has asked for.

“That would be unusual for [judges] to have their own private accounts,” he said. “We certainly wouldn’t do it, I can tell you that. That’s wild.”

Catoosa County Manager Jim Walker and Dade County Executive Ted Rumley said their local governments also do not let superior court judges use operating accounts.

Gilmer County Commission Chairman Charlie Paris, who took office in the beginning of 2015, said he did not know how long his county had given Weaver her own private account. He said he wants to research the issue more before deciding whether to continue operating that way.

It’s also unclear whether Weaver was allowed to use public money on a private lawsuit against the newspaper, said Jessica Gabel Cino, the associate dean for academic affairs for the Georgia State University College of Law.

“It seems to me the judge shouldn’t just use the funds unless there is something on paper that enables her to do so,” Cino wrote in an email, adding that Weaver has not made it clear whether she has specific jurisdiction to use the money in that manner.

Looking forward

Since the arrest, Thomason and the Georgia Society of Professional Journalists have filed complaints against Weaver with the Judicial Qualifications Commission, the state agency in charge of overseeing judges. Weaver also happens to be the chairwoman of that agency’s board, appointed by the state supreme court.

It’s unclear how the commission will react to the complaints. First, the Georgia constitution prohibits the agency from publicly commenting on investigations. Second, the agency’s lone position for an investigator is unfilled. And third, the agency’s board meetings are closed to the public.

Contact staff writer Tyler Jett at 423-757-6476 or Follow him on Twitter @LetsJett.


Dog Food Recall Alert
Dog Food Advisor
Dear Fellow Dog Lover,

Because you signed up on our website and asked to be notified, I’m sending you this special recall alert. If you no longer wish to receive these emails, please click to unsubscribe.

Mars Petcare has announced it is voluntarily recalling limited lots of its Cesar dog food products due to potential choking risk from small pieces of plastic that entered the food during production.

To learn which products are affected, please visit the following link:Cesar Dog Food Recall of October 2016

Please be sure to share the news of this alert with other pet owners.

Mike Sagman, Editor
The Dog Food Advisor

P.S. Not already on our dog food recall notification list yet? Sign up to get critical dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. There’s no cost for this service.

Two Million People Evacuate Due to Hurricane Matthew – Trump’s Response is INCREDIBLE!

trump hurricane matthew

Two Million People Evacuate Due to Hurricane Matthew – Trump’s Response is INCREDIBLE!

Two Million People Evacuate Due to Hurricane Matthew – Trump’s Response is INCREDIBLE!

Now officially a category 4 storm, Hurricane Matthew is about to be very bad.

Florida just called for the evacuation of millions of people from their homes, trying to keep them alive and safe.

Amid warnings from the National Weather Service that Hurricane Matthew could render Florida “uninhabitable for weeks,” thousands of coastal residents boarded up, packed up and hit the road for what could be a historic Category 4 or 5 blow to the state.

Thursday afternoon President Barack Obama declared a state of emergency in Florida, just hours after Florida Gov. Rick Scott said warrned that “this will kill you.”.

Amid warnings from the National Weather Service that Hurricane Matthew could render Florida “uninhabitable for weeks,” thousands of coastal residents boarded up, packed up and hit the road for what could be a historic Category 4 or 5 blow to the state.

Thursday afternoon President Barack Obama declared a state of emergency in Florida, just hours after Florida Gov. Rick Scott said warrned that “this will kill you.”

Donald Trump has issued an important response:

“Our thoughts and prayers go out to everyone in the path of Hurricane Matthew, namely in Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas, and we encourage everyone to listen to their governors and local emergency officials urging the evacuations of at-risk coastal communities.

These warnings are very, very serious — if your home is in the path of the hurricane and you are being advised to leave, you need to do so right now. Nothing is more important than the safety of your family.

“I would also like to offer my thanks to the law enforcement, first responders and power crews making the necessary preparations for the storm and carrying out their plans to help our communities survive and recover in the aftermath.

“I also want to extend my personal condolences to those families in Haiti who lost loved ones as this storm tore through their island. The news reports that over a hundred people are feared dead saddens us all, and the United States should offer our assistance to help our island neighbors.

“Please stay safe.” — Donald J. Trump

While Hillary Clinton is busy buying ads on the Weather Channel, Donald Trump is sounding like a real leader. This is 100% classy.

Read more: