Georgia Gun Laws: What You Should Know
USCCA – 04/08/2019

Georgia Gun Laws: What You Should Know

As a responsibly armed American, you already know how challenging it can be to stay up to date on gun laws…

Georgia gun owners, you’re in luck. We’ve gathered some of the most frequently asked firearms questions in Georgia. Read on for answers to some of the top questions regarding Georgia gun laws. (Not from Georgia? Don’t worry, your state is coming soon…)

Can You Have a Loaded Gun in Your Car in Georgia?

Yes, any person who is not prohibited by law from possessing a handgun or long gun may have or carry it in his or her vehicle (owned or rented by you). In a vehicle you do not own, you must have the permission of the person who has legal control of the vehicle.

Can You Drink and Carry a Gun in Georgia?

Per GA Code § 16-11-134, you may not discharge a firearm while under the influence. You may carry with a valid permit in restaurants that serve alcohol, unless posted.

As a responsibly armed American, regardless of the laws in your state, it is unwise to carry while under the influence of any substance that could impair your judgment, slow your reaction times or impact your decision-making abilities. Any decision you make while carrying a firearm could have life-altering consequences.

Is Georgia a Stand Your Ground State?

Yes. Per Georgia Code § 16-3-21, a person has no duty to retreat and is justified in threatening or using force against another. This is only when the person reasonably believes such threat or force is necessary to defend himself or herself or a third person against another’s imminent use of unlawful force or to prevent death or great bodily injury. Force may also be used to prevent the commission of a forcible felony, such as rape, armed robbery or kidnapping.

Is Georgia an Open Carry State?

No, you must have a Georgia Weapons Carry License (WCL) or a license from a state that Georgia honors. The minimum age to obtain a WCL is 21, and no training is required.

Is It Legal to Keep a Gun in Your Glove Box in Georgia?

Yes, Georgia allows anyone who is not prohibited from possessing firearms to have or carry a gun on his or her person inside a vehicle.

Is There a Castle Law in Georgia?

Yes, a person is justified in threatening or using force against another when he or she reasonably believes that such threat is necessary to prevent or stop an unlawful entry into or attack upon a home. The use of deadly force is only justified if the entry is attempted or made for the purpose of assault or violence against any person in the house.

Can You Carry a Gun Into a Bar in Georgia?

Yes, a person with a Georgia Weapons Carry License or a license from a state that Georgia honors may carry a concealed firearm in any location that is not off-limits, per Georgia Code Ann. § 16-11-127(b).

As a responsibly armed American, regardless of the laws in your state, it is unwise to carry while under the influence of any substance that could impair your judgment, slow your reaction times or impact your decision-making abilities. Any decision you make while carrying a firearm could have life-altering consequences.

Ready to Learn More About Georgia Gun Laws?

It is your responsibility as a gun owner to know and understand the laws regarding your concealed carry rights. The USCCA’s Concealed Carry Reciprocity & Gun Laws Map has been designed to help inform and educate armed citizens like you. To learn more about Georgia’s concealed carry permit application process, concealed carry restrictions and CCW training requirements, visit the Georgia gun laws page now….

The information contained on this website is provided as a service to USCCA, Inc. members and the concealed carry community and does not constitute legal advice. Although we attempt to address all areas of concealed carry laws in all states, we make no claims, representations, warranties, promises or guarantees as to the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information disclosed. Legal advice must always be tailored to the individual facts and circumstances of each particular case, and laws are constantly changing; as such, nothing contained on this website should be used as a substitute for the advice of a lawyer.