PHOTOS: Hong Kong Protesters Embrace American Flag in Fight for Freedom

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PHOTOS: Hong Kong Protesters Embrace American Flag in Fight for Freedom
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FRANCES MARTEL29 Jul 2010 5:24
https://www.breitbart.com/asia/2019/07/29/hong-kong-protesters-embrace-american-flag-fight-freedom/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_term=daily&utm_campaign=20190729&utm_content=A

The American flag has become a symbol of resistance against China in the ongoing protests in Hong Kong, prominently waved throughout the city this past weekend as police fired tear gas and rubber bullets into the peaceful crowds.
Millions of Hong Kong residents have participated in rallies since early June against a bill proposed in the city’s legislature that would have allowed China to extradite anyone present in Hong Kong by accusing him or her of breaking Chinese law. Under the “One Country, Two Systems” policy China agreed to when the U.K. handed Hong Kong over in 1997, Hong Kong must abandon any claims to sovereignty in exchange for China not imposing communist laws on the city. The protesters objected that the extradition law would violate that policy.

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam claimed the bill was “dead” this month, but protesters astutely noted that lawmakers had tabled the bill, allowing them to revive it any time. Protesters are demanding that the Legislative Council withdraw the bill entirely.

Protests this weekend were not about the bill, but against gang violence towards protesters last week. Pro-democracy advocates congregated last week in northern Yuen Long, a rural area outside of the central city, to protest the bill. Following the protest, an estimated 100 white-clad thugs surrounded the peaceful crowds moving into the Yuen Long Mass Transit Rail (MTR) station, beating them with metal rods and bamboo sticks. Following the mob attack, 45 people were hospitalized and, despite the dozens of attackers, little more than ten people arrested.

Police have since confirmed that some in the crowd had ties to Hong Kong’s triads, or organized crime groups. Protesters in Yuen Long this weekend accused police of collaborating with the protesters, citing videos showing officers calmly chatting with some of the mob.

Protesters prominently waved American flags in Yuen Long on Saturday during a protest for which police refused to issue a permit:
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Billy H.C. Kwok/Getty Images

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Protesters are seen during a stand-off with the police in the district of Yuen Long on July 27, 2019 in Hong Kong (Billy H.C. Kwok/Getty Images).

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Protesters hold US flags, as commuters waiting at a light rail station watch, during a demonstration in the district of Yuen Long in Hong Kong on July 27, 2019 (Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images).
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Laurel Chor/Getty Images
Protesters hold up umbrellas and American flags in the face of advancing riot police in the district of Yuen Long on July 27, 2019, in Hong Kong (Laurel Chor/Getty Images).

As Hong Kong police denied the protesters a permit to march, they attacked the crowd despite its peaceful nature, using tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse them. Journalists on the ground noted that the protesters appeared unarmed and did not move against the police when the attacks began. Video circulating on social media appeared to show elderly residents of a Yuen Long nursing home coughing and choking on tear gas seeping through the windows, angering many in Hong Kong.

Police also arrested Max Chung, the pro-democracy activist who initially requested a permit for the march. Police denied the permit despite the fact that, unlike previous protests, it was not exclusively against the Hong Kong government, but against the triads who attacked the protesters.

Protests continued Sunday despite the violence in Yuen Long on Saturday, this time within the Hong Kong city center. Protesters also waved American flags there. Some carried signs reading “We need the 2nd Amendment” and “President Trump, please liberate Hong Kong”:
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ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/Getty Images

Protesters march during a demonstration in Hong Kong on July 28, 2019 (Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images).
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Billy H.C. Kwok/Getty Images
Protesters demonstrate toward Causeway bay on July 28, 2019, in Hong Kong (Billy H.C. Kwok/Getty Images).

This weekend was not the first time the American flag surfaced as a symbol against Chinese tyranny. Pro-democracy protesters prominently waved the flag a week ago in the city center:
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ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/Getty Images

A protester waves the US and Hong Kong flags as demonstrators occupy a road during a march against a controversial extradition bill in Hong Kong on July 21, 2019 (Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images).
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ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/Getty Images

A man waves a US and Hong Kong flag while standing on a divider after he and other protesters occupied Harcourt Road while marching against a controversial extradition bill in Hong Kong on July 21, 2019. (Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images).

“We hope the U.S. and other nations will be able to help Hong Kong fight against Communist China’s policies,” a protester identified as Kelvin Wong told Bloomberg News in remarks published on July 15. “We need human rights, democracy, and freedom. These are the same values we share with the U.S. These are universal values. Now we are resisting Communist China, which doesn’t like these values but also interferes with Hong Kong.”

Wong emphasized that, despite claims from Beijing, they “are not influenced by foreign powers.”

Another protester, Wildy Chan, told the Hong Kong Free Press that same week that he was waving a U.S. flag to urge America to act in support of Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement. Chan stated that he, in particular, supported the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, a bill Rep. Chris Smith (R-NJ) introduced, which, if passed, would facilitate visas to Hong Kong residents to escape communist China if necessary and require the State Department to submit an annual report evaluating if “Hong Kong is sufficiently autonomous to justify special treatment by the United States for bilateral agreements and programs.”

China has dismissed the Hong Kong protest movement as an attempt by the United States to destabilize China’s economy, even given the minimal commentary on Hong Kong from the White House. President Donald Trump went as far as to recently compliment Chinese Communist Party leader Xi Jinping, stating that he has “acted responsibly” in response to protests.

“Judging from what was on the media, we see clear signs of foreign manipulation, orchestration and even organization in the relevant violent incidents,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said last week following Trump’s positive comments. “I hope the US will answer this question honestly and clearly: what role did the US play in the recent incidents in Hong Kong and what is your purpose behind it?”

“Though lacking self-knowledge, the US, I believe, should at least know one thing. Hong Kong belongs to China, and China does not allow any foreign interference in Hong Kong affairs. Nor will we allow any foreign forces to mess up Hong Kong,” Hua concluded. “We advise the US to withdraw its dirty hands from Hong Kong as soon as possible.”

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Delaware Supreme Court Sums Up Entire Gun Debate In Ruling

Delaware Supreme Court Sums Up Entire Gun Debate In Ruling

Delaware Supreme Court Sums Up Entire Gun Debate In Ruling


Posted at 6:00 pm on December 18, 2017 by Tom Knighton

(Photo by the Associated Press)

It’s not often that a court captures a debate perfectly in a sentence or two. After all, most debates are complex things that require layers of discussion.

However, the Delaware State Supreme Court just lowered the boom on restrictions that kept lawfully owned and carried firearms out of state parks. In the process, they summed up what we’ve been saying for years regarding firearms and gun control laws.

The Superior Court earlier upheld the ban based on the “important governmental objective of keeping the public safe from the potential harm of firearms in state parks and forests,” The Court did not believe the regulations violated any constitutional rights.

“But that conclusion is based on the questionable notion — unsupported by reference to any evidence – that outlawing possession of firearms in an area makes law-abiding citizens safer because criminals will, for some reason, obey the regulations,” the Supreme Court majority found.

This is it in a nutshell. That’s what we keep telling gun control zealots over and over, and they still persist in pretending that somehow gun laws will somehow keep criminals from using firearms.

It won’t. We know this because of what transpires in places like New York City, where just this past weekend there was a gunfight between groups of men. No police involvement, just bad guys.

The criminals do not follow the rules, so as a result, gun laws only impact the law-abiding.

Some have argued that this line of reasoning could also be applied to any crime as only the criminals break those laws as well, which is sort of true. The difference is that guns allow the law-abiding to protect themselves. Laws against murder protect me. Laws against guns make me far more likely to be a victim.

That’s the fundamental truth that led the Delaware Supreme Court to their ruling.

At no point will rules forbidding the carrying of firearms actually make anyone safer. The idea that they will betrays a fundamental ignorance in the gun grabbers’ line of thinking. They don’t and they never will.

It’s part of why so many Second Amendment advocates refuse to visit establishments where their firearms aren’t welcome. They know that if they comply with that rule, they may well be the only one who complies with it. The violent felon with anger management issues won’t care. He’ll ignore the law and we all know it.

That leaves me and mine disarmed except for the magical thinking of people who believe these rules actually accomplish anything.

For residents of Delaware, it seems clear that their supreme court has their back. It seems their court understands that rules only inhibit the lawful and does nothing to the criminal except, at best, add another charge they can have leveled against them. If that’s the goal, so be it, but don’t pretend it’s a safety issue.

Rules like that make Americans less safe, and we all know it. If only the gun grabbers would learn that lesson rather than pontificating endlessly on just how superior they are simply because they want to disarm the average American.

A blue catfish caught on Georgia’s Altamaha River this past weekend weighed 93 pounds — a new state record

WASV New and Associated Press:

Georgia angler sets new record with 93 lb. catfish caught on Altamaha River

https://mgtvwsav.files.wordpress.com/2017/10/bluecat-richardbarrett-oct2017.jpg?w=172&h=305
WAYCROSS, Ga. (AP) — A blue catfish caught on Georgia’s Altamaha River this past weekend weighed 93 pounds — a new state record.

Georgia’s Department of Natural Resources says in a Tuesday news release that angler Richard Barrett’s catch beat the old record by more than 12 pounds.

The department says Barrett, who is from Axson, caught the fish Saturday using a live channel catfish caught earlier in the day as bait.

Barrett told the department’s Wildlife Resources Division he was shocked when he got the fish to the surface. He said he was worried he wouldn’t be able to get it into his boat.

John Biagi, chief of Fisheries for the Wildlife Resources Division, said Barrett’s catch was the first state record for 2017.

Our first Fukushima Fish landed in GA!

Susan Montoya Bryan for Associated Press: Mishaps at Nuke Repository Lead to $54M in Fines

Mishaps at nuke repository lead to $54M in fines

By SUSAN MONTOYA BRYAN, Associated Press
12:03 PM, Dec 6, 2014


Picture by Joe Cavaretta
Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) – New Mexico on Saturday levied more than $54 million in penalties against the U.S. Department of Energy for numerous violations that resulted in the indefinite closure of the nation’s only underground nuclear waste repository.

The state Environment Department delivered a pair of compliance orders to Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, marking the state’s largest penalty ever imposed on the agency. Together, the orders outline more than 30 state permit violations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico and at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

The orders and the civil penalties that come with them are just the beginning of possible financial sanctions the Energy Department could face in New Mexico. The state says it’s continuing to investigate and more fines are possible.

The focus has been on a canister of waste from Los Alamos that ruptured in one of WIPP’s storage rooms in February. More than 20 workers were contaminated and the facility was forced to close, putting in jeopardy efforts around the country to clean up tons of Cold War-era waste.

The state accuses Los Alamos of mixing incompatible waste, treating hazardous waste without a permit and failing to notify regulators about changes in the way waste was being handled. The penalties for the lab total $36.6 million.

“New Mexico does not need to choose between fulfilling the laboratory’s mission and protecting the environment,” Ryan Flynn, state environment secretary, said in a letter to Los Alamos officials. “DOE now has an opportunity to learn from these mistakes and implement meaningful corrective actions that will ensure the long-term viability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory.”

He wrote a similar letter to officials at WIPP, saying New Mexicans understand the nuclear repository’s importance but that it must be operated and maintained with “the highest standards of safety and complete transparency.” WIPP’s penalties total $17.7 million.

Moniz has said repeatedly that it’s a top priority for his agency to get WIPP on track, and he took steps earlier this year to shift oversight of the cleanup work at Los Alamos from the National Nuclear Security Administration to his agency’s Office of Environmental Management.

It wasn’t immediately clear Saturday whether DOE would seek a hearing on the penalties levied by New Mexico or pursue settlement negotiations. A message seeking comment was left with the agency.

Federal officials are expected to release a final accident investigation report before the end of the year. They have already said that cleanup and resuming full operations at WIPP could take years. The price tag has been estimated a half-billion dollars.

The state’s investigation has covered the radiological release as well as a fire nine days earlier that involved a truck carrying salt in an another area of the underground facility. The state says its findings confirmed the existence of major procedural problems that contributed to the events.

While investigators have yet to pinpoint exactly what caused the barrel to breach, they suspect a chemical reaction in highly acidic waste that was packed with organic cat litter to absorb moisture. According to the state, experts had notified the lab to stop using organic materials as early as 2012 because of the possible dangers of mixing them with nitrates salts.

Copyright 2014 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.