“The Ocean is Dying”: Marine and Animal Life Die Offs, California Coast Pacific Ocean is “Turning Into a Desert”


“The Ocean is Dying”: Marine and Animal Life Die Offs, California Coast
Pacific Ocean is “Turning Into a Desert”
By Mac Slavo
Global Research, November 11, 2018
The SHTF Plan
Region: USA
Theme: Environment
(This article was first published by Global Research in May 2015)

It was the dying cry of Charlton Heston in the creepy 1973 film Soylent Green… and it could resemble our desperate near future.

The ocean is dying, by all accounts – and if so, the food supply along with it. The causes are numerous, and overlapping. And massive numbers of wild animal populations are dying as a result of it.

Natural causes in the environment are partly to blame; so too are the corporations of man; the effects of Fukushima, unleashing untold levels of radiation into the ocean and onto Pacific shores; the cumulative effect of modern chemicals and agricultural waste tainting the water and disrupting reproduction.

A startling new report says in no uncertain terms that the Pacific Ocean off the California coast is turning into a desert. Once full of life, it is now becoming barren, and marine mammals, seabirds and fish are starving as a result. According to Ocean Health:

The waters of the Pacific off the coast of California are a clear, shimmering blue today, so transparent it’s possible to see the sandy bottom below […] clear water is a sign that the ocean is turning into a desert, and the chain reaction that causes that bitter clarity is perhaps most obvious on the beaches of the Golden State, where thousands of emaciated sea lion pups are stranded.

[…]

Over the last three years, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has noticed a growing number of strandings on the beaches of California and up into the Pacific north-west. In 2013, 1,171 sea lions were stranded, and 2,700 have already stranded in 2015 – a sign that something is seriously wrong, as pups don’t normally wind up on their own until later in the spring and early summer.

“[An unusually large number of sea lions stranding in 2013 was a red flag] there was a food availability problem even before the ocean got warm.”Johnson: This has never happened before… It’s incredible. It’s so unusual, and there’s no really good explanation for it. There’s also a good chance that the problem will continue, said a NOAA research scientist in climatology, Nate Mantua.

Experts blame a lack of food due to unusually warm ocean waters. NOAA declared an El Nino, the weather pattern that warms the Pacific, a few weeks ago. The water is three and a half to six degrees warmer than the average, according to Mantua, because of a lack of north wind on the West Coast. Ordinarily, the north wind drives the current, creating upwelling that brings forth the nutrients that feed the sardines, anchovies and other fish that adult sea lions feed on.

Fox News added:

The warm water is likely pushing prime sea lion foods — market squid, sardines and anchovies — further north, forcing the mothers to abandon their pups for up to eight days at a time in search of sustenance.

The pups, scientists believe, are weaning themselves early out of desperation and setting out on their own despite being underweight and ill-prepared to hunt.

[…]

“These animals are coming in really desperate. They’re at the end of life. They’re in a crisis … and not all animals are going to make it,” said Keith A. Matassa, executive director at the Pacific Marine Mammal Center, which is currently rehabilitating 115 sea lion pups.

The same is true of seabirds on the Washington State coast:

In the storm debris littering a Washington State shoreline, Bonnie Wood saw something grisly: the mangled bodies of dozens of scraggly young seabirds. Walking half a mile along the beach at Twin Harbors State Park on Wednesday, Wood spotted more than 130 carcasses of juvenile Cassin’s auklets—the blue-footed, palm-size victims of what is becoming one of the largest mass die-offs of seabirds ever recorded. “It was so distressing,” recalled Wood, a volunteer who patrols Pacific Northwest beaches looking for dead or stranded birds. “They were just everywhere. Every ten yards we’d find another ten bodies of these sweet little things.”

“This is just massive, massive, unprecedented,” said Julia Parrish, a University of Washington seabird ecologist who oversees the Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST), a program that has tracked West Coast seabird deaths for almost 20 years. “We may be talking about 50,000 to 100,000 deaths. So far.” (source)

100,000 doesn’t necessarily sound large, statistically speaking, but precedent in the history of recorded animal deaths suggests that it is, in fact massive. Even National Geographic is noting that these die off events are “unprecedented.” Warmer water is indicated for much of the starvation faced by many of the dead animals.

Last year, scientists sounded the alarm over the death of millions of star fish, blamed on warmer waters and ‘mystery virus’:


Starfish are dying by the millions up and down the West Coast, leading scientists to warn of the possibility of localized extinction of some species. As the disease spreads, researchers may be zeroing in on a link between warming waters and the rising starfish body count. (source)

[…]

The epidemic, which threatens to reshape the coastal food web and change the makeup of tide pools for years to come, appears to be driven by a previously unidentified virus, a team of more than a dozen researchers from Cornell University, UC Santa Cruz, the Monterey Bay Aquarium and other institutions reported Monday. (source)

Changing temperatures in the Pacific Ocean, driven by the natural cycle of gyres over decades, shifts wildlife populations, decimating the populations of species throughout the food chain, proving how fragile the balance of life in the ocean really is.

Recently, the collapse of the sardine population has created a crisis for fisheries and marine wildlife alike on the West Coast:

Commercial fishing for sardines off of Canada’s West Coast is worth an estimated $32 million – but now they are suddenly gone. Back in October, fisherman reported that they came back empty-handed without a single fish after 12 hours of trolling and some $1000 spent on fuel.

Sandy Mazza, for the Daily Breeze, reported a similar phenomenon in central California: “[T]he fickle sardines have been so abundant for so many years – sometimes holding court as the most plentiful fish in coastal waters – that it was a shock when he couldn’t find one of the shiny silver-blue coastal fish all summer, even though this isn’t the first time they’ve vanished.” [emphasis added]

[…]
“Is it El Nino? Pacific Decadal Oscillation? [La] Nina? Long-term climate change? More marine mammals eating sardines? Did they all go to Mexico or farther offshore? We don’t know. We’re pretty sure the overall population has declined. We manage them pretty conservatively because we don’t want to end up with another Cannery Row so, as the population declines, we curb fishing.” said National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) official Kerry Griffin. (source)

According to a report in the Daily Mail, the worst events have wiped out 90% of animal populations, falling short of extinction, but creating a rupture in food chains and ecosystems.

And environmental factors are known to be a factor, with pollution from chemicals dumped by factories clearly tied to at least 20% of the mass die off events of wildlife populations that have been investigated, and many die offs implicated by a number of overlapping factors. TheDaily Mail reported:

Mass die-offs of certain animals has increased in frequency every year for seven decades, according to a new study.

Researchers found that such events, which can kill more than 90 per cent of a population, are increasing among birds, fish and marine invertebrates.

The reasons for the die-offs are diverse, with effects tied to humans such as environmental contamination accounting for about a fifth of them.

Farm runoff from Big Agra introduces high levels of fertilizers and pesticides which createoxygen-starved dead zones which fish and aquatic live is killed off. Also preset in agriculture waste are gender bending chemicals like those found in Atrazine, used in staple crop production, and antibiotics and hormones, used in livestock production, which creates hazardous runoff for fish populations:

Livestock excrete natural hormones – estrogens and testosterones – as well as synthetic ones used to bolster their growth. Depending on concentrations and fish sensitivity, these hormones and hormone mimics might impair wild fish reproduction or skew their sex ratios. (source)

Pharmaceutical contaminants are also to blame for changing the sex of fish and disrupting population numbers, while a study found that the chemicals in Prozac changed the behavior of marine life, and made shrimp many times more likely to “commit suicide” and swim towards the light where they became easy prey.

Fish farms also introduce a large volume of antibiotic and chemical pollution into oceans and waterways:

The close quarters where farmed fish are raised (combined with their unnatural diets) means disease occurs often and can spread quickly. On fish farms, which are basically “CAFOs of the sea,” antibiotics are dispersed into the water, and sometimes injected directly into the fish.

Unfortunately, farmed fish are often raised in pens in the ocean, which means not only that pathogens can spread like wildfire and contaminate any wild fish swimming past – but the antibiotics can also spread to wild fish (via aquaculture and wastewater runoff) – and that’s exactly what recent research revealed. (source)

Mass die offs of fish on the Brazilian coastline have linked to pollution from the dumping of raw sewage and garbage.

In the last few days it was reported that a massive die off of bottlenose dolphins in the Gulf of Mexico was connected by researchers to BP’s Deep Water Horizon oil spill. Evidence was found in a third of the cases of lesions in the adrenal gland, an otherwise rare condition linked with petroleum exposure. More than a fifth of the dolphins also suffered bacterial pneumonia, causing deadly lung infection that is likewise rarely seen in dolphin populations.
How Ocean Pollution Affects Human Health
The original source of this article is The SHTF Plan
Copyright © Mac Slavo, The SHTF Plan, 2018

Advertisements

ENENews: TV: Shocking number of cancers around leaking nuclear plant near NYC… Tens of thousands of cases recently reported… “More than anywhere else in US”… “Why is this story not being covered by everybody?” — Teacher: “I can’t believe the number of teachers who have gotten cancer”


TV: Shocking number of cancers around leaking nuclear plant near NYC… Tens of thousands of cases recently reported… “More than anywhere else in US”… “Why is this story not being covered by everybody?” — Teacher: “I can’t believe the number of teachers who have gotten cancer” (VIDEOS)
http://enenews.com/tv-shocking-number-cancers-around-nuclear-plant-nyc-anywhere-story-being-covered-everybody-teacher-believe-number-teachers-gotten-cancer?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ENENews+%28Energy+News%29
Published: March 2nd, 2016 at 6:59 pm ET
By ENENews

‘Indian Point Nuke Plant Middle School Cancer Cluster’, Myla Reson, Jun 2014:
Vicki Fox, teacher of social studies at Lakeland Copper Beech Middle School in Yorktown Heights less than 10 miles from Indian Point (emphasis added): “My name is Vicki Fox, I’m a middle school teacher at a school that is just a few miles from Indian Point… I really can’t tell you how many teachers and students I’ve met there over the years who are survivors of cancer — specifically thyroid cancer. I was talking about this to a woman who is an aide… and she said ‘Oh, do you know that I had thyroid cancer?’… She’s just another. This year again I’m working with somebody who has had thyroid cancer. One of my students this year… he had cancer on his optic nerve and is almost blind. As I said, I can’t believe the number of teachers who have gotten cancer. And I think it’s because they live in this area.”

‘Indian Point – We are flirting with catastrophe’, The Big Picture RT, Feb 16, 2016:
Reporter: “It’s an alarming story, and I thought of it as an alarming story ever since I started researching it, because there are some things that people generally don’t know… it gave me a feeling of, ‘Why is this story not being covered by everybody?’ So I went there [to Indian Point] and of course have been told by the company running it that it is safe, that the latest leak has been contained, and that there is nothing to worry about. But then I got to meet people who used to live in the area and they said that they had cancer, thyroid cancer, which was the biggest shocker to me since, again, it has been grossly under reported in the United States. Or even more so, people are just laughing at the suggestion that a nuclear plant operating 25 miles from New York City can cause cancer. So this was the biggest shocker”…
Host: “If you’ve got a bunch of thyroid cancers around or downwind of Indian Point, that means that they’ve been venting radioactive gases?”
Reporter: “That’s the way any nuclear plant in the world operates, it emits radiation. Whether in large doses in case of a leak, or in small doses, but it does emit it anyways — it’s just the way it operates… I come from part of the world where Chernobyl happened… it’s been taught in schools that thyroid cancer is caused by radiation. You have people in the area of Indian Point in masses, 20,000 people diagnosed with cancer… over 15 years — more than anywhere else in the United States.”

From yesterday: “Uncontrollable radioactive flow” coming from nuclear plant near NYC — Actual releases are “trillions of times” higher than reported during latest leak (VIDEO):
http://enenews.com/uncontrollable-radioactive-flow-coming-nuclear-plant-nyc-actual-releases-trillions-times-higher-reported-during-latest-leak-cracks-multiple-spent-fuel-pools-intense-investigation-underway-be

Disarming Legal Citizens as Targets for Criminals

Scott Bernstein
CEO – International Security Consultant at Global Security International (GSI)
OWNER

Obama’s heating up his pen for this next. Lining ourselves up as Targets.

ENENEWS: “Giant whales found piled up dead on west coast beach”

Giant whales found piled up dead on west coast beach — Second largest animals on planet — Official: “It’s never happened… Extremely unusual… Very rare and odd… We want to know why” — Gov’t scientists testing for Fukushima radiation — Backlog at lab due to so many recent deaths (PHOTOS)

 http://enenews.com/disturbing-giant-whales-found-piled-dead-west-coast-beach-official-never-happened-before-extremely-unusual-very-rare-odd-govt-scientists-testing-fukushima-radiation-photos?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ENENews+%28Energy+News%29
Published: November 20th, 2015 at 4:55 am ET
By
Email Article Email Article
43 comments

CKNW News Talk 980, Nov 18, 2015 (emphasis added): The Department of Fisheries and Oceans is looking into the death of three fin whales near Bella Bella on BC’s central coast… Paul Cottrel with the DFO says a multiple death like this is extremely unusual. “We just get one or two a year, and usually never in the same area like this, or on the same beach which iseven more rare. So that’s why it’s definitely a very unique situation.” He says all three whales were juvenile males, two of them likely younger than two-years-old… He says there were no bite marks on the carcasses, or any signs of boat strike either. Cottrel says the DFO conducted a necropsy, but found no obvious cause of death.

Global News, Nov 19, 2015: Questions raised after carcasses of 3 dead fin whales found near Bella Bella… “It is very rare and odd that you get three large whales together in one small area,” says Cottrell. “We want to know why it happened, whether it is a natural event, killer whale predation or something else.” Cottrell says, to his knowledge, it has never happened in B.C. before, which is a source for concern. The fin whales are listed as threatened under the Species At Risk Act… and are the second-largest animal on the planet after blue whales. “Any time you get three animals that wash up and die together and it is a threatened species, we are going to work hard to figure out what happened,” he says… “Given the location and where they ended up, all close together, we are thinking that the animals likely live stranded and died there together”…

Vancouver Sun Nov 19, 2015: The recent deaths of three young fin whales near Bella Bella are causing concern after a summer that saw an unusual spike in large whale deaths… “Fin whales are listed as threatened under the Species at Risk Act, so every animal is extremely important to the population. Seeing three together, obviously it’s disturbing and we want to find out what happened,” Cottrell said. He added that it’s very unusual for baleen whales like fins to die in groups… Samples have been taken from the whales’ stomachs and colons… The results of lab tests may take a while, though, because of a backlog caused by a pulse of large whale deaths this summer along the West Coast of North America. “We’re really working everybody pretty hard, and these three fin whales doesn’t lessen the load at all,” Cottrell said. Four humpback whales were found dead in a single week in B.C. waters in August, and as of this week, five fin whale carcasses have been discovered. One sperm whale and one grey whale have also died this year. Meanwhile, more than 30 large whales have died off the coast of Alaska. Scientists have yet to determine why so many whales have died… Scientists are also testing for radionucleotides to see if radioactivity was a factor.

Coastal Guardian Watchmen Network, Oct 27, 2015: Heiltsuk Guardian Watchmen found this large plastic tote and a tire… near Bella Bella yesterday. Tsunami debris is still arriving

From last week: “Unprecedented”: Largest animal on earth found dead on West Coast, “very sick… very emaciated” — TV: Food supply is being “killed off… many sea creatures affected” — Expert: Most whales we’ve been tracking for past two years are not doing well… “I think we’re going to see more of this” (VIDEO)

See also: Giant whales found dead up & down Pacific NW coast, scientists ‘baffled’ over surge — 25+ carcasses reported in past month — Gov’t: “Troubling… Definitely a pulse of deaths” — Experts: “Alarming spike… Exceptionally rare to see a dead humpback” — Concerns about unidentified pathogen (PHOTOS)

Published: November 20th, 2015 at 4:55 am ET
By
Email Article Email Article
43 comments

RABIES ALERTS


RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
2015-05-20 08:37:21 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150520-48295-USA
Date&Time: 2015-05-20 08:37:21 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of New Mexico,
Location: Lincoln Country,

Description:
Health officials say they’ve found a strain of rabies they’ve never seen before after a fox bit a woman in Lincoln County. The woman the fox bit is now OK. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said when it tested the fox, it found a strain it had never seen before. Health officials believe it’s linked to bats, which are well-known for transmitting the disease — not just to foxes, but raccoons, coyotes and domesticated pets. Residents should keep children and pets away from wild animals, Game and Fish officials said. They also said after seeing a potentially rabid animal, residents should contact their local Animal Control Department. Additionally, never touch a dead or sick animal and make sure pets are up-to-date on rabies shots, they said. Rabies can be fatal in humans unless treated quickly. Residents should get medical help immediately if they come in contact with a rabid animal.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (fox)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-05-20 08:37:21 [UTC]
————————————————
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary

2015-05-21 03:41:03 – Biological Hazard – USA
EDIS Code: BH-20150521-48308-USA
Date&Time: 2015-05-21 03:41:03 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Massachusetts,
Location: ,
City: North Attleborough

Description:
A raccoon tested positive for rabies in North Attleboro, Animal Control Officer Karen Fontneau said Wednesday. The raccoon was killed in a fight with a loose dog in the wooded area of Wild Acres Road. “Luckily, the dogs’ owner was there,” Fontneau said. “The dog was currently up to date on rabies vaccinations, was taken right to the vets, given a booster rabies vaccine, and is currently under a 45 day quarantine period.” If the dog was not up to date, it would have been a three month total isolation in an approved boarding facility (at the owners cost), and then a three month strict confinement in the home, or be euthanized. There is the same quarantine for cats and ferrets. “If you see any new wounds on your pets, have them seen by your vet,” Fontneau said. “Keep your pets currently vaccinated at all times and follow all leash laws. Keep your cats indoors, as you have no idea what they have come in contact with while outside. Keep wildlife afraid of people, scare them off when you see them, yell, bang, throw things, squirt then with a hose. If they have a certain path through your yard, put obstacles in the way to make them change their routes. Keep them wild, and afraid of us.”

The name of Hazard: Rabies (raccoon)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed

—————————————–
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary

2015-05-21 03:36:59 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150521-48306-USA
Date&Time: 2015-05-21 03:36:59 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Florida,
City: Lake Worth
Number of infected people: 6

Description:
Six people are being treated after exposure to a rabid cat that was caught west of Lake Worth, and authorities are urging the cat’s former owners to come forward because they may have been exposed to the disease. Animal Care and Control Capt. David Walesky and Tim O’Connor, of the Palm Beach County Health Department, spoke Wednesday afternoon and said they are looking for a second possibly rabid cat in the neighborhood near Lake Worth Road just east of Florida’s Turnpike. There is no description of the missing feline. Two cats were thrown from a vehicle Friday evening near the 3000 block of Woods Walk Boulevard, just north of Lake Worth Road near the Publix shopping plaza, and good Samaritans in the neighborhood attempted to rescue the cats, but one got away. Before the cat was turned over to animal control, it bit and scratched six people, O’Connor said. Walesky said they’re advising those in the neighborhood not to feed or handle animals they do not know. At this point, they don’t know whether they’re looking for a live animal or a dead one. O’Connor said they are not looking into any criminal charges at this time for whoever discarded the cats, but they want to know who they are so they can begin rabies treatment before it’s too late. “It’s a fatal disease unless treated, and there’s a 10-day window to get the medication into their system,” O’Connor said. “We’re on day seven.” Officials at the health department say that the incubation period for rabies is anywhere from three to eight weeks, so those who don’t show any signs of being sick soon after coming in contact with a rabid animal may think they’re good to go. But once individuals start showing symptoms, it’s too late, officials say. As far as symptoms for rabid animals, it ranges, Walesky said. Raccoons and foxes tend to act friendly at first, while other animals just act manic. Once they reach the final stages, the animals become lethargic and then die, he said. “The best way (to handle a rabid animal) is not to handle it,” Walesky said, adding that the best thing to do is to call animal control so they can handle it.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (human exposures)
Species: Spread

Posted:2015-05-21 03:36:59 [UTC]
—————————————————–
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
2015-05-16 02:49:52 – Biological Hazard – USA
EDIS Code: BH-20150516-48228-USA
Date&Time: 2015-05-16 02:49:52 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of North Carolina,
Location: Randolph County,

Description:
The Randolph County Health Department has stated that a cat found on Friday May 8th in the Stoneybrook subdivision has tested positive for rabies. This is in the Brookhollow Lane area of Archdale, off of Balfour Drive. Animal control officers are spreading the word in the area where the cat was found by distributing flyers to surrounding homes. Residents are urged to contact the Randolph County Health Department or 911 immediately if they see other animals in this neighborhood showing any unusual behavior. Rabies is a very dangerous disease that if not prevented, causes death in animals and people. Signs of rabies in animals include: difficult walking, slobbering, unusually friendly behavior in wild animals, unusually timid behavior in normally friendly animals and vicious behavior.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (cat)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-05-16 02:49:52 [UTC]
————————————————–
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL

2015-05-02 04:26:03 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150502-48028-USA
Date&Time: 2015-05-02 04:26:03 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of North Carolina,
Location: Wake County,

Description:
Wake County officials issued a warning on Friday evening after rabies was confirmed in a raccoon. Authorities said people who live in the area closest to the intersection of Mt. Vernon Church and Leslie Drive should be cautious. The raccoon tested positive for rabies on Thursday after it was taken to the state lab in Raleigh for testing. Officials said there was no known human or animal contact with the raccoon. “We don’t want to alarm residents in who live near the Mt. Vernon Church and Leslie Drive area, but they should be aware of these cases and of the potential for exposure to themselves, family members and their pets,” said Sue Lynn Ledford, Community Health director for Wake County. “Do not approach an animal that you don’t know.” Animal Control officers expressed concern for unvaccinated pets in the Northern Wake County area, and urged pet owners to get animals their current rabies shots at a local veterinarian’s office. Anyone who sees an animal acting unusually should call animal control.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (raccoon)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-05-02 04:26:03 [UTC]
—————————————————-

RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
2015-05-11 03:24:07 – Biological Hazard – USA
EDIS Code: BH-20150511-48159-USA
Date&Time: 2015-05-11 03:24:07 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Tennessee,
Location: Tazewell County,

Description:
The first case of rabies in Tazewell County was confirmed this week, that’s according to the Tazewell County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff’s Office said about a month ago, a raccoon was turned over from Animal Control to the health department for testing. This weekend, the test came back positive for rabies. According to the Sheriff’s Office, Animal Control officers have also collected five other raccoons suspected of having rabies, but those test results have not yet come in. The Sheriff’s Office asks people to call local law enforcement is they suspect an animal has rabies.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (raccoon)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed

Posted:2015-05-11 03:24:07 [UTC]
———————————————–
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
2015-04-28 03:13:50 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150428-47971-USA
Date&Time: 2015-04-28 03:13:50 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of South Carolina,
Location: Aiken County,
Number of infected people: 2

Description:
Two Aiken County residents were referred to their health care providers for treatment after being “potentially exposed” to rabies by a raccoon in North Augusta, according to the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control. The incident happened April 21 when the raccoon was killed by the victims’ dogs, according to Jim Beasley, a spokesman for DHEC. The victims were potentially exposed to the raccoon’s saliva by handling the dogs, and the raccoon tested positive for rabies Wednesday. “To reduce the risk of getting rabies, we recommend that people avoid wild animals acting tame and tame animals acting wild,” said Sandra Craig, of DHEC’s Bureau of Environmental Health Services. She added that about 275 South Carolinians must undergo preventative treatment for rabies each year, with most exposures coming from bites or scratches by a rabid or suspected rabid animal. “If you think you have been exposed to the rabies virus through a bite, scratch or the saliva of a possibly infected animal, immediately wash the affected area with plenty of soap and water,” Craig said. “Then be sure to get medical attention and report the incident to DHEC.” There were 139 confirmed cases of animal rabies in South Carolina in 2014, according to DHEC numbers. There have been 45 confirmed cases statewide this year, and this is the third animal to test positive in Aiken County, where 11 animals total tested positive in 2014.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (human exposures)
Species: Spread
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-04-28 03:13:50 [UTC]
————————————-