Trump shares image of hero dog injured in Baghdadi raid By Maegan Vazquez, CNN

image
(Photo by Tolga Akmen / AFP) (Photo by TOLGA AKMEN/AFP via Getty Images)

Trump shares image of hero dog injured in Baghdadi raid
By Maegan Vazquez, CNN
https://www.cnn.com/2019/10/28/politics/hero-dog-baghdadi-raid/index.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+rss%2Fcnn_topstories+%28RSS%3A+CNN+-+Top+Stories%29
Updated 6:40 PM ET, Mon October 28, 2019
Trump shares image of hero dog who chased down Baghdadi

Washington (CNN)There are good dogs — and then there are hero dogs who chase down the world’s top terrorist to his fatal demise.
President Donald Trump said that a dog, part of the US operation that resulted in the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi over the weekend, was injured while chasing Baghdadi down a dead-end tunnel.
Trump declassified a photo of the dog on Monday afternoon, tweeting, “We have declassified a picture of the wonderful dog (name not declassified) that did such a GREAT JOB in capturing and killing the Leader of ISIS, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi!”

The dog is believed to have been sent down the tunnel after it was feared that Baghdadi was wearing a suicide vest. Baghdadi was indeed wearing a suicide vest and detonated it in the tunnel, killing himself and three children.

The President said that the tunnel collapsed during the explosion. He also appeared to refer to more than one dog on the scene of the chase, saying Sunday morning that Baghdadi “reached the end of the tunnel, as our dogs chased him down.”

The dog, part of the Army Delta force, which executed the raid, was believed to have been injured from an electrocution and is recovering, a US defense official said.

The President called the dog “beautiful” and “talented,” but so far its name and handler remain a mystery. Additionally, a description of the breed has not been released.

“It’s a Delta operation, we can’t tell you the name of the dog,” one defense official told CNN.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley also declined to name the K-9, saying that the dog is still “in theater” and returned to duty with its handler “so we are not going to release just yet photos or names of dogs or anything else.”

“We’re not releasing the name of the dog right now. The dog is still in theater. The dog, the K-9, the military working dog, performed a tremendous service as they all do in a variety of situations,” he said at a Pentagon news conference Monday.

The US military typically relies on German shepherds and Belgian Malinois.

This isn’t the first time American armed forces have relied on a dog for backup in operations targeting terrorists. In 2011, a dog named Cairo took part in the raid that led to Osama bin Laden’s death. Cairo secured the area around the bin Laden compound while Navy SEALs went in.
CNN’s Barbara Starr and Jamie Crawford contributed to this report.

This story has been updated.


Home › Uncategorized › Do Your Dog’s Treats Contain These Low-Quality Ingredients?
Do Your Dog’s Treats Contain These Low-Quality Ingredients?
Posted on 02/27/2018 by Jason Lustig

Do Your Dog’s Treats Contain These Low-Quality Ingredients?

Dog treats have come a long way over the years. We used to keep a box of those dry, bone-shaped biscuits in the cupboard to give to Fido every once and awhile. Today, trainers and dog owners agree that healthy and nutritious treats are an essential training tool that provides positive reinforcement for pups.
Don’t Be Fooled By Cheap Ingredients in Nice Packaging

Unfortunately, the extremely profitable pet industry features several brands oversaturating the market with cheap treats made with low-quality and potentially harmful ingredients. You can’t trust the brand packaging itself, as pet food companies use tricks to make their food appear better than it is. Their pretty packaging can be misleading, but the ingredient list offers a more truthful look at what’s actually in your dog’s food. Pick up any dog treat product at the store, and you will see a long list of ingredients– many of them you can’t even pronounce, let alone understand.

The Worst Ingredients in Dog Treats and Dog Food

Butylated Hydroxyanisole or BHA
Butylated Hydroxytoluene or BHT
Ethoxyquin
Food dyes including Blue 2, Red 40, Yellow 5, Yellow 6, and 4-MIE
Propylene Glycol or PG
Rendered fat
Corn and wheat gluten
Meat and grain meals and by-products

BHA and BHT are synthetic antioxidants that are possible carcinogens that may also interfere with hormone function. Long-term exposure to high doses of BHT is proven to be toxic in mice and rats. It can also cause liver, thyroid and kidney problems and can hurt lung function and blood coagulation.

Ethoxyquin is a fat preservative that is also used as a pesticide as well as in the process of making rubber (yuck!). Studies have found that it can cause liver damage, as well. Synthetic food dyes are entirely unnecessary and only contribute to the visual appeal of a product for humans– your dog couldn’t care less! They link to cancer, allergies, and hyperactivity. Propylene Glycol is a controversial form of mineral oil that may cause allergic reactions as well as skin, liver and kidney damage.

Corn and wheat gluten are both ingredients used as meat substitutes that are less nutritionally complete than real meat proteins. Manufacturers add them to dog foods and treat to make their products seem better than they are. Other ingredients including If you’re feeding your dogs products containing these ingredients, they may not be getting the nutrition they need. Furthermore, many dogs are gluten intolerant and can suffer from severe inflammation and allergic reactions when consumed.

Of all the ingredients listed above, rendered fat, and meat/grain meals or by-products probably sound the most familiar. The problem is there are little to no regulations when it comes to disclosing from which animals pet food manufacturers are sourcing their “rendered fat,” “meals,” and “by-products.” You may be feeding your beloved pets the remains of diseased cattle, tumor-ridden chickens, roadkill, zoo animals, and even euthanized dogs and cats from veterinarians and shelters. Rendered fat is also a source of harmful microorganisms, toxins, and can facilitate the growth of harmful bacteria and mold.
Other Bad Ingredients to Look Out For

Other ingredients to look out for include: white flour, monosodium glutamate (MSG), corn syrup, farmed salmon, xylitol, sugar alcohols, sodium nitrate, soy, sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP), salt, vegetable oil, cellulose, brewers rice, corn, sodium hexametaphosphate, animal digest, pea protein, and artificial flavor.
The Preen Pets Difference

At Preen Pets, we only use simple whole ingredients like extra lean chicken breast, USDA extra lean beef, and sweet potatoes to create healthy, all-natural treats your dogs love. We never use ingredients you haven’t heard of. And certainly, none that could potentially harm your dog.

Our treats do not contain questionable ingredients. Many other treat companies use chemical preservatives, synthetic food dyes, and cheap sources of protein.

At Preen Pets, we see dogs as members of our family, so we only use ingredients we’d be comfortable consuming ourselves. We craft our treats here in the U.S.A. using all-natural farm-fresh ingredients that are hormone free and slow-oven baked to retain as much nutritional value as possible. We are so confident your dogs will love our treats, we offer a 100% money-back guarantee.
Browse Our Dog Treats >

IMPORTANT DOG FOOD RECALL!

Dog Food Recall Alert
DA
Dog Food Advisor
 2000-01-22-2000-01-22-001-003
Dear Fellow Dog Lover,

Because you signed up on our website and asked to be notified, I’m sending you this special recall alert. If you no longer wish to receive these emails, please click to unsubscribe.

Mars Petcare has announced it is voluntarily recalling limited lots of its Cesar dog food products due to potential choking risk from small pieces of plastic that entered the food during production.

To learn which products are affected, please visit the following link:Cesar Dog Food Recall of October 2016

Please be sure to share the news of this alert with other pet owners.

Mike Sagman, Editor
The Dog Food Advisor

P.S. Not already on our dog food recall notification list yet? Sign up to get critical dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. There’s no cost for this service.

Pawstruck.com

Hi yall!
Ya know, I rarely post anything light-hearted, rarely anythign without the doom and gloom of what is going to kill us all (Fukushima) I even have a blog called DeKalb County Sux, where I show total discontent with the way the County is run.
Never anything about how wonderful something or someone is.
Today, I felt the need to post just that thing, something nice.

So, I am going to tell you how wonderful Pawstruck.com is. I was sad that I was going to have to move on to order the treat that my four-legged babies love the most. I won’t give a lot of details cause I was offered something I could not refuse to stay with them. I mean really, some companies, apparently, want to keep you as a customer enough to bend over backwards for you, to show how much they appreciate you. Pawstruck.com did that for me. Little ole me!

I want everyone who has four-legged babies to order at least one time from there. You won’t be sorry. I know, that I have yet to regret placing an order with them. They have great prices, and for once, a company really cares when you thank them for all they have done…
So, to show my appreciation to them, and to my friends here, that read my blogs, I wanted to pass them on to you. Seriously, I have not seen a company care this much for years.
Give them a try, you won’t be sorry!

Sincerely
nootkabear

The Atlantic: A New Origin Story for Dogs

Katie Salvi
Tens of thousands of years ago, before the internet, before the Industrial Revolution, before literature and mathematics, bronze and iron, before the advent of agriculture, early humans formed an unlikely partnership with another animal—the grey wolf. The fates of our two species became braided together. The wolves changed in body and temperament. Their skulls, teeth, and paws shrank. Their ears flopped. They gained a docile disposition, becoming both less frightening and less fearful. They learned to read the complex expressions that ripple across human faces. They turned into dogs.

Today, dogs are such familiar parts of our lives—our reputed best friends and subject of many a meme—that it’s easy to take them, and what they represent, for granted. Dogs were the first domesticated animals, and their barks heralded the Anthropocene. We raised puppies well before we raised kittens or chickens; before we herded cows, goats, pigs, and sheep; before we planted rice, wheat, barley, and corn; before we remade the world.

“Remove domestication from the human species, and there’s probably a couple of million of us on the planet, max,” says archaeologist and geneticist Greger Larson. “Instead, what do we have? Seven billion people, climate change, travel, innovation and everything. Domestication has influenced the entire earth. And dogs were the first.” For most of human history, “we’re not dissimilar to any other wild primate. We’re manipulating our environments, but not on a scale bigger than, say, a herd of African elephants. And then, we go into partnership with this group of wolves. They altered our relationship with the natural world.”

Larson wants to pin down their origins. He wants to know when, where, and how they were domesticated from wolves. But after decades of dogged effort, he and his fellow scientists are still arguing about the answers. They agree that all dogs, from low-slung corgis to towering mastiffs, are the tame descendants of wild ancestral wolves. But everything else is up for grabs.

Some say wolves were domesticated around 10,000 years ago, while others say 30,000. Some claim it happened in Europe, others in the Middle East, or East Asia. Some think early human hunter-gatherers actively tamed and bred wolves. Others say wolves domesticated themselves, by scavenging the carcasses left by human hunters, or loitering around campfires, growing tamer with each generation until they became permanent companions.

Dogs were domesticated so long ago, and have cross-bred so often with wolves and each other, that their genes are like “a completely homogenous bowl of soup,” Larson tells me, in his office at the University of Oxford. “Somebody goes: what ingredients were added, in what proportion and in what order, to make that soup?” He shrugs his shoulders. “The patterns we see could have been created by 17 different narrative scenarios, and we have no way of discriminating between them.”

The only way of doing so is to look into the past. Larson, who is fast-talking, eminently likable, and grounded in both archaeology and genetics, has been gathering fossils and collaborators in an attempt to yank the DNA out of as many dog and wolf fossils as he can. Those sequences will show exactly how the ancient canines relate to each other and to modern pooches. They’re the field’s best hope for getting firm answers to questions that have hounded them for decades.

And already, they have yielded a surprising discovery that could radically reframe the debate around dog domestication, so that the big question is no longer when it happened, or where, but how many times.

*    *   *

On the eastern edge of Ireland lies Newgrange, a 4,800-year-old monument that predates Stonehenge and the pyramids of Giza. Beneath its large circular mound and within its underground chambers lie many fragments of animal bones. And among those fragments, Dan Bradley from Trinity College Dublin found the petrous bone of a dog.

Press your finger behind your ear. That’s the petrous. It’s a bulbous knob of very dense bone that’s exceptionally good at preserving DNA. If you try to pull DNA out of a fossil, most of it will come from contaminating microbes and just a few percent will come from the bone’s actual owner. But if you’ve got a petrous bone, that proportion can be as high as 80 percent. And indeed, Bradley found DNA galore within the bone, enough to sequence the full genome of the long-dead dog.

Larson and his colleague Laurent Frantz then compared the Newgrange sequences with those of almost 700 modern dogs, and built a family tree that revealed the relationships between these individuals. To their surprise, that tree had an obvious fork in its trunk—a deep divide between two doggie dynasties. One includes all the dogs from eastern Eurasia, such as Shar Peis and Tibetan mastiffs. The other includes all the western Eurasian breeds, and the Newgrange dog.

The genomes of the dogs from the western branch suggest that they went through a population bottleneck—a dramatic dwindling of numbers. Larson interprets this as evidence of a long migration. He thinks that the two dog lineages began as a single population in the east, before one branch broke off and headed west. This supports the idea that dogs were domesticated somewhere in China.

But there’s a critical twist.

The team calculated that the two dog dynasties split from each other between 6,400 and 14,000 years ago.  But the oldest dog fossils in both western and eastern Eurasia are older than that. Which means that when those eastern dogs migrated west into Europe, there were already dogs there.

To Larson, these details only make sense if dogs were domesticated twice.

Here’s the full story, as he sees it. Many thousands of years ago, somewhere in western Eurasia, humans domesticated grey wolves. The same thing happened independently, far away in the east. So, at this time, there were two distinct and geographically separated groups of dogs. Let’s call them Ancient Western and Ancient Eastern. Around the Bronze Age, some of the Ancient Eastern dogs migrated westward alongside their human partners, separating from their homebound peers and creating the deep split in Larson’s tree. Along their travels, these migrants encountered the indigenous Ancient Western dogs, mated with them (doggy style, presumably), and effectively replaced them.

Today’s eastern dogs are the descendants of the Ancient Eastern ones. But today’s western dogs (and the Newgrange one) trace most of their ancestry to the Ancient Eastern migrants. Less than 10 percent comes from the Ancient Western dogs, which have since gone extinct.

This is a bold story for Larson to endorse, not least because he himself has come down hard on other papers suggesting that cows, sheep, or other species were domesticated twice. “Any claims for more than one need to be substantially backed up by a lot of evidence,” he says. “Pigs were clearly domesticated in Anatolia and in East Asia. Everything else is once.” Well, except maybe dogs.

*   *   *

Katie Salvi

Other canine genetics experts think that Larson’s barking up the wrong tree. “I’m somewhat underwhelmed, since it’s based on a single specimen,” says Bob Wayne from the University of California, Los Angeles. He buys that there’s a deep genetic division between modern dogs. But, it’s still possible that dogs were domesticated just once, creating a large, widespread, interbreeding population that only later resolved into two distinct lineages.

In 2013, Wayne’s team compared the mitochondrial genomes (small rings of DNA that sit outside the main set) of 126 modern dogs and wolves, and 18 fossils. They concluded that dogs were domesticated somewhere in Europe or western Siberia, between 18,800 and 32,100 years ago. And genes aside, “the density of fossils from Europe tells us something,” says Wayne. “There are many things that look like dogs, and nothing quite like that in east Asia.”

Peter Savolainen from the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm disagrees. By comparing the full genomes of 58 modern wolves and dogs, his team has shown that dogs in southern China are the most genetically diverse in the world. They must have originated there around 33,000 years ago, he says, before a subset of them migrated west 18,000 years later.

That’s essentially the same story that Larson is telling. The key difference is that Savolainen doesn’t buy the existence of an independently domesticated group of western dogs. “That’s stretching the data very much,” he says. Those Ancient Western dogs might have just been wolves, he says. Or perhaps they were an even earlier group of migrants from the east. “I think the picture must seem a bit chaotic,” he says understatedly. “But for me, it’s pretty clear. It must have happened in southern East Asia. You can’t interpret it any other way.”

Except, you totally can. Wayne does (“I’m certainly less dogmatic than Peter,” he says). Adam Boyko from Cornell University does, too: after studying the genes of village dogs—free-ranging mutts that live near human settlements—he argued for a single domestication in Central Asia, somewhere near India or Nepal. And clearly, Larson does as well.

Larson adds that his gene-focused peers are ignoring one crucial line of evidence—bones. If dogs originated just once, there should be a neat gradient of fossils with the oldest ones at the center of domestication and the youngest ones far away from it. That’s not what we have. Instead, archaeologists have found 15,000-year-old dog fossils in western Europe, 12,500-year-old ones in east Asia, and nothing older than 8,000 years in between.

“If we’re wrong, then how on earth do you explain the archaeological data?” says Larson. “Did dogs jump from East Asia to Western Europe in a week, and then go all the way back 4,000 years later?” No. A dual domestication makes more sense. Mietje Genompré, an archaeologist from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, agrees that the bones support Larson’s idea. “For me, it’s very convincing,” she says.

But even Larson is hedging his bets. When I ask him how strong his evidence is, he says, “Like, put a number on it? If was being bold, I’d say it’s a 7 out of 10. We lack the smoking gun.”

Why is this is so hard? Of all the problems that scientists struggle with, why has the origin of dogs been such a bitch to solve?

For starters, the timing is hard to pin down because no one knows exactly how fast dog genomes change. That pace—the mutation rate—underpins a lot of genetic studies. It allows scientists to compare modern dogs and ask: How long ago must these lineages have diverged in order to build up this many differences in their genes? And since individual teams use mutation rate estimates that are wildly different, it’s no wonder they’ve arrive at conflicting answers.

Regardless of the exact date, it’s clear that over thousands of years, dogs have mated with each other, cross-bred with wolves, travelled over the world, and been deliberately bred by humans. The resulting ebb and flow of genes has turned their history into a muddy, turbid mess—the homogeneous soup that Larson envisages.

Wolves provide no clarity. Grey wolves used to live across the entire Northern Hemisphere, so they could have potentially been domesticated anywhere within that vast range (although North America is certainly out). What’s more, genetic studies tell us that no living group of wolves is more closely related to dogs than any other, which means that the wolves that originally gave rise to dogs are now extinct. Sequencing living wolves and dogs will never truly reveal their shrouded past; it’d be, as Larson says, like trying to solve a crime when the culprit isn’t even on the list of suspects.

“The only way to know for sure is to go back in time,” he adds.

*    *   *

Katie Salvi

The study informally known as the Big Dog Project was born of frustration. Back in 2011, Larson was working hard on the origin of domestic pigs, and became annoyed that scientists studying dogs were getting less rigorous papers in more prestigious journals, simply because their subjects were that much more charismatic and media-friendly. So he called up his longstanding collaborator Keith Dobney. “Through gritted teeth, I said: We’re fucking doing dogs. And he said: I’m in.”

Right from the start, the duo realized that studying living dogs would never settle the great domestication debate. The only way to do that was to sequence ancient DNA from fossil dogs and wolves, throughout their range and at different points in history. While other scientists were studying the soup of dog genetics by tasting the finished product, Larson would reach back in time to taste it at every step of its creation, allowing him to definitively reconstruct the entire recipe.

In recent decades, scientists have become increasingly successful at extracting and sequencing strands of DNA from fossils. This ancient DNA has done wonders for our understanding of our own evolution. It showed, for example, how Europe was colonized 40,000 years ago by hunter-gatherers moving up from Africa, then 8,000 years ago by Middle Eastern farmers, and 5,000 years ago by horse-riding herders from the Russian steppes. “Everyone in Europe today is a blend of those three populations,” says Larson, who hopes to parse the dog genome in the same way, by slicing it into its constituent ingredients.

Larson originally envisaged a small project—just him and Dobney analyzing a few fossils. But he got more funding, collaborators, and samples than he expected. “It just kind of metastasized out of all proportion,” he says. He and his colleagues would travel the world, drilling into fossils and carting chips of bone back to Oxford. They went to museums and private collections. (“There was a guy up in York who had a ton of stuff in his garage.”) They grabbed bones from archaeological sites.

The pieces of bone come back to a facility in Oxford called the Palaeo-BARN—the Palaeogenomics and Bioarchaeology Research Network. When I toured the facility with Larson, we wore white overalls, surgical masks, oversoles, and purple gloves, to keep our DNA (and that of our skin microbes) away from the precious fossil samples. Larson called them ‘spacesuits.’ I was thinking ‘thrift-store ninja.’

In one room, the team shoves pieces of bone into a machine that pounds it with a small ball bearing, turning solid shards into fine powder. They then send the powder through a gauntlet of chemicals and filters to pull out the DNA and get rid of everything else. The result is a tiny drop of liquid that contains the genetic essence of a long-dead dog or wolf. Larson’s freezer contains 1,500 such drops, and many more are on the way. “It’s truly fantastic the kind of data that he has gathered,” says Savolainen.

True to his roots in archaeology, Larson isn’t ignoring the bones. His team photographed the skulls of some 7,000 prehistoric dogs and wolves at 220 angles each, and rebuilt them in virtual space. They can use a technique called geometric morphometrics to see how different features on the skulls have evolved over time.

The two lines of evidence—DNA and bones—should either support or refute the double domestication idea. It will also help to clear some confusion over a few peculiar fossils, such as a 36,000 year old skull from Goyet cave in Belgium. Genompré thinks it’s a primitive dog. “It falls outside the variability of wolves: it’s smaller and the snout is different,” she says. Others say it’s too dissimilar to modern dogs. Wayne has suggested that it represents an aborted attempt at domestication—a line of dogs that didn’t contribute to modern populations and is now extinct.

Maybe the Goyet hound was part of Larson’s hypothetical Ancient Western group, domesticated shortly after modern humans arrived in Europe. Maybe it represented yet another separate flirtation with domestication. All of these options are on the table, and Larson thinks he has the data to tell them apart. “We can start putting numbers on the difference between dogs and wolves,” he says. “We can say this is what all the wolves at this time period look like; does the Goyet material fall within that realm, or does it look like dogs from later on?”

Larson hopes to have the first big answers within six to twelve months. “I think it’ll clearly show that some things can’t be right, and will narrow down the number of hypotheses,” says Boyko. “It may narrow it down to one but I’m not holding my breath on that.” Wayne is more optimistic. “Ancient DNA will provide much more definitive data than we had in the past,” he says. “[Larson] convinced everyone of that. He’s a great diplomat.”

Indeed, beyond accumulating DNA and virtual skulls, Larson’s greatest skill is in gathering collaborators. In 2013, he rounded up as many dog researchers as he could and flew them to Aberdeen, so he could get them talking. “I won’t say there was no tension,” he says. “You go into a room with someone who has written something that sort of implies you aren’t doing very good science… there will be tension. But it went away very quickly. And, frankly: alcohol.”

“Everyone was like: You know what? If I’m completely wrong and I have to eat crow on this, I don’t give a shit. I just want to know.”

RABIES ALERTS


RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
2015-05-20 08:37:21 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150520-48295-USA
Date&Time: 2015-05-20 08:37:21 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of New Mexico,
Location: Lincoln Country,

Description:
Health officials say they’ve found a strain of rabies they’ve never seen before after a fox bit a woman in Lincoln County. The woman the fox bit is now OK. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said when it tested the fox, it found a strain it had never seen before. Health officials believe it’s linked to bats, which are well-known for transmitting the disease — not just to foxes, but raccoons, coyotes and domesticated pets. Residents should keep children and pets away from wild animals, Game and Fish officials said. They also said after seeing a potentially rabid animal, residents should contact their local Animal Control Department. Additionally, never touch a dead or sick animal and make sure pets are up-to-date on rabies shots, they said. Rabies can be fatal in humans unless treated quickly. Residents should get medical help immediately if they come in contact with a rabid animal.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (fox)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-05-20 08:37:21 [UTC]
————————————————
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary

2015-05-21 03:41:03 – Biological Hazard – USA
EDIS Code: BH-20150521-48308-USA
Date&Time: 2015-05-21 03:41:03 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Massachusetts,
Location: ,
City: North Attleborough

Description:
A raccoon tested positive for rabies in North Attleboro, Animal Control Officer Karen Fontneau said Wednesday. The raccoon was killed in a fight with a loose dog in the wooded area of Wild Acres Road. “Luckily, the dogs’ owner was there,” Fontneau said. “The dog was currently up to date on rabies vaccinations, was taken right to the vets, given a booster rabies vaccine, and is currently under a 45 day quarantine period.” If the dog was not up to date, it would have been a three month total isolation in an approved boarding facility (at the owners cost), and then a three month strict confinement in the home, or be euthanized. There is the same quarantine for cats and ferrets. “If you see any new wounds on your pets, have them seen by your vet,” Fontneau said. “Keep your pets currently vaccinated at all times and follow all leash laws. Keep your cats indoors, as you have no idea what they have come in contact with while outside. Keep wildlife afraid of people, scare them off when you see them, yell, bang, throw things, squirt then with a hose. If they have a certain path through your yard, put obstacles in the way to make them change their routes. Keep them wild, and afraid of us.”

The name of Hazard: Rabies (raccoon)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed

—————————————–
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary

2015-05-21 03:36:59 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150521-48306-USA
Date&Time: 2015-05-21 03:36:59 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Florida,
City: Lake Worth
Number of infected people: 6

Description:
Six people are being treated after exposure to a rabid cat that was caught west of Lake Worth, and authorities are urging the cat’s former owners to come forward because they may have been exposed to the disease. Animal Care and Control Capt. David Walesky and Tim O’Connor, of the Palm Beach County Health Department, spoke Wednesday afternoon and said they are looking for a second possibly rabid cat in the neighborhood near Lake Worth Road just east of Florida’s Turnpike. There is no description of the missing feline. Two cats were thrown from a vehicle Friday evening near the 3000 block of Woods Walk Boulevard, just north of Lake Worth Road near the Publix shopping plaza, and good Samaritans in the neighborhood attempted to rescue the cats, but one got away. Before the cat was turned over to animal control, it bit and scratched six people, O’Connor said. Walesky said they’re advising those in the neighborhood not to feed or handle animals they do not know. At this point, they don’t know whether they’re looking for a live animal or a dead one. O’Connor said they are not looking into any criminal charges at this time for whoever discarded the cats, but they want to know who they are so they can begin rabies treatment before it’s too late. “It’s a fatal disease unless treated, and there’s a 10-day window to get the medication into their system,” O’Connor said. “We’re on day seven.” Officials at the health department say that the incubation period for rabies is anywhere from three to eight weeks, so those who don’t show any signs of being sick soon after coming in contact with a rabid animal may think they’re good to go. But once individuals start showing symptoms, it’s too late, officials say. As far as symptoms for rabid animals, it ranges, Walesky said. Raccoons and foxes tend to act friendly at first, while other animals just act manic. Once they reach the final stages, the animals become lethargic and then die, he said. “The best way (to handle a rabid animal) is not to handle it,” Walesky said, adding that the best thing to do is to call animal control so they can handle it.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (human exposures)
Species: Spread

Posted:2015-05-21 03:36:59 [UTC]
—————————————————–
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
2015-05-16 02:49:52 – Biological Hazard – USA
EDIS Code: BH-20150516-48228-USA
Date&Time: 2015-05-16 02:49:52 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of North Carolina,
Location: Randolph County,

Description:
The Randolph County Health Department has stated that a cat found on Friday May 8th in the Stoneybrook subdivision has tested positive for rabies. This is in the Brookhollow Lane area of Archdale, off of Balfour Drive. Animal control officers are spreading the word in the area where the cat was found by distributing flyers to surrounding homes. Residents are urged to contact the Randolph County Health Department or 911 immediately if they see other animals in this neighborhood showing any unusual behavior. Rabies is a very dangerous disease that if not prevented, causes death in animals and people. Signs of rabies in animals include: difficult walking, slobbering, unusually friendly behavior in wild animals, unusually timid behavior in normally friendly animals and vicious behavior.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (cat)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-05-16 02:49:52 [UTC]
————————————————–
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL

2015-05-02 04:26:03 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150502-48028-USA
Date&Time: 2015-05-02 04:26:03 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of North Carolina,
Location: Wake County,

Description:
Wake County officials issued a warning on Friday evening after rabies was confirmed in a raccoon. Authorities said people who live in the area closest to the intersection of Mt. Vernon Church and Leslie Drive should be cautious. The raccoon tested positive for rabies on Thursday after it was taken to the state lab in Raleigh for testing. Officials said there was no known human or animal contact with the raccoon. “We don’t want to alarm residents in who live near the Mt. Vernon Church and Leslie Drive area, but they should be aware of these cases and of the potential for exposure to themselves, family members and their pets,” said Sue Lynn Ledford, Community Health director for Wake County. “Do not approach an animal that you don’t know.” Animal Control officers expressed concern for unvaccinated pets in the Northern Wake County area, and urged pet owners to get animals their current rabies shots at a local veterinarian’s office. Anyone who sees an animal acting unusually should call animal control.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (raccoon)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-05-02 04:26:03 [UTC]
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RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
2015-05-11 03:24:07 – Biological Hazard – USA
EDIS Code: BH-20150511-48159-USA
Date&Time: 2015-05-11 03:24:07 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Tennessee,
Location: Tazewell County,

Description:
The first case of rabies in Tazewell County was confirmed this week, that’s according to the Tazewell County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff’s Office said about a month ago, a raccoon was turned over from Animal Control to the health department for testing. This weekend, the test came back positive for rabies. According to the Sheriff’s Office, Animal Control officers have also collected five other raccoons suspected of having rabies, but those test results have not yet come in. The Sheriff’s Office asks people to call local law enforcement is they suspect an animal has rabies.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (raccoon)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed

Posted:2015-05-11 03:24:07 [UTC]
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RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
2015-04-28 03:13:50 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150428-47971-USA
Date&Time: 2015-04-28 03:13:50 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of South Carolina,
Location: Aiken County,
Number of infected people: 2

Description:
Two Aiken County residents were referred to their health care providers for treatment after being “potentially exposed” to rabies by a raccoon in North Augusta, according to the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control. The incident happened April 21 when the raccoon was killed by the victims’ dogs, according to Jim Beasley, a spokesman for DHEC. The victims were potentially exposed to the raccoon’s saliva by handling the dogs, and the raccoon tested positive for rabies Wednesday. “To reduce the risk of getting rabies, we recommend that people avoid wild animals acting tame and tame animals acting wild,” said Sandra Craig, of DHEC’s Bureau of Environmental Health Services. She added that about 275 South Carolinians must undergo preventative treatment for rabies each year, with most exposures coming from bites or scratches by a rabid or suspected rabid animal. “If you think you have been exposed to the rabies virus through a bite, scratch or the saliva of a possibly infected animal, immediately wash the affected area with plenty of soap and water,” Craig said. “Then be sure to get medical attention and report the incident to DHEC.” There were 139 confirmed cases of animal rabies in South Carolina in 2014, according to DHEC numbers. There have been 45 confirmed cases statewide this year, and this is the third animal to test positive in Aiken County, where 11 animals total tested positive in 2014.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (human exposures)
Species: Spread
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-04-28 03:13:50 [UTC]
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