Glyphosate found in popular brands of beer and wine, including organic

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Glyphosate found in popular brands of beer and wine, including organic
by: Lori Alton, staff writer | May 24, 2019

https://www.naturalhealth365.com/glyphosate-found-in-wine-2937.html

Glyphosate found in popular brands of beer and wine, including organic(NaturalHealth365) It seems there’s no escaping glyphosate – the primary ingredient in Roundup, a weed killer manufacture by Monsanto. In 2017, the FDA raised alarm with a bombshell report acknowledging the presence of the pesticide in everyday foods such as breakfast cereals, honey and ice cream. Now, a new report from the California Public Interest Research Group (CalPIRG), reveals that glyphosate residue has also been found in a variety of common wines and beers sold in the United States – including those certified as organic.

As you probably know, scientific studies have linked glyphosate with a host of illnesses, including liver disease, reproductive damage and cancer. In fact, the chemical is currently the subject of thousands of state and federal lawsuits linking it to non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Glyphosate found in organic beer and wine, research reveals
To conduct the test, researchers evaluated 20 samples of domestic and imported wines and beers, all sold in the United States. Sampled wine brands included conventionally-grown varieties such as Barefoot, Beringer, and Sutter Home.

And, yes, two organically grown wines, Frey and Inkarri Estates, were included.

In terms of beer, researchers looked at Coors, Corona, Heineken, Sam Adams, Stella Artois and Tsingtao. A pair of organic beers, Peak and Samuel Smith, were tested as well.

Disturbingly, all samples of the beverages contained glyphosate – albeit in varying levels.

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Sutter Home Merlot was the “high-ringer” for glyphosate found, with 51 parts per billion. Not far behind was Beringer Cabernet Sauvignon, with 42.6 ppb.

Among the beers, Tsingtao – with 49.7 ppb – was most contaminated. Budweiser, Coors, Corona and Miller had less glyphosate found, but many brands still averaged over 20 ppb.

And, while the organic beverages had the lowest levels of glyphosate, they were not devoid of the chemical – as one would expect.

Inkarri Malbec: Certified Organic had 5.2 ppb, Frey Organic Natural Wine contained 4.8 ppb, and Samuel Smith Organic Lager had 3.5 ppb. Only one sample – Peak Organic Beer – did not contain detectable amounts of glyphosate.

While these readings are all below the EPA’s tolerance for glyphosate in beverages, the CalPIRG authors point out that even infinitesimal amounts of glyphosate may be hazardous. In one study, as little as one part per trillion of glyphosate was capable of stimulating the growth of breast cancer cells and disrupting the endocrine system.

In addition, ingestion of amounts as small as 0.1 ppb can destroy beneficial gut bacteria, thereby disrupting the balance of the all-important gut microbiome.

Natural health advocates call for total ban on glyphosate
Roundup – the most commonly used agricultural chemical in the world – is currently heavily sprayed on food crops in the United States, including wheat, soybeans and corn.

The development of Roundup Ready seeds – GMO seeds engineered specifically for use with glyphosate – has caused use of the pesticide to skyrocket in recent decades. For example, the U.S. applied close to 275 million pounds of glyphosate in 2016, compared to less than 10 million pounds in 1992.

Although glyphosate was originally billed as a ‘healthy alternative’ to more dangerous pesticides, a growing body of research is drawing attention to the health risks. Currently, many natural health advocates and experts – including CalPIRG, who authored the report – call for the banning of glyphosate until/unless it can be proven safe.

Of course, many natural health experts, physicians and researchers maintain that “glyphosate safety” is the very epitome of an oxymoron, along the lines of such famous examples as “jumbo shrimp.”

In 2015, the World Health Organization classified glyphosate as a probable carcinogen – and went on record as saying that the chemical could pose “significant risks” to human health. In 2017, the state of California agreed, officially listing the pesticide as a likely carcinogen as well.

And some California communities have completely banned the use of glyphosate-based pesticides on city property. No doubt, the growing backlash against glyphosate appears to be reflected in the courts.

Last year, a California jury ruled that Monsanto pay $289 million to a man dying of cancer, who said his illness resulted from repeated exposure to glyphosate in his job as a groundskeeper.

Use as a weed killer and drying agent allows glyphosate to enter food and drink
It’s really not much of a stretch to see how glyphosate enters foods made from conventionally-grown crops.

Roundup is routinely sprayed on agricultural fields, including on barley and wheat crops used in brewing, and in vineyards that yield grapes for wine. In addition to being used to kill weeds, glyphosate is sometimes used as a preharvest “dessicant,” or drying agent – and is sprayed directly on plants!

In addition, contamination can occur from water used to irrigate fields. Although we rarely hear about the issue of toxic water being used on our food supply.

Glyphosate easily enters waterways, runoffs, rivers and streams. In one study, glyphosate was found in 70 percent of rainwater samples tested.

Other studies detected glyphosate in several Midwestern streams at the height of the growing season. But, organic contamination is harder to explain – as organic brewers and vintners are prohibited from using glyphosate.

But possible culprits could include overspray from neighboring farms, toxic water supplies and contamination from airborne drift – which can occur over several hundred feet.

And, because glyphosate residue can linger in soil and water for years, contamination can occur in organic fields which have been converted from conventional farming.

Shocking fact: There are currently no safety limits for glyphosate in beer and wine
CalPIRG recommended that the United States follow the lead of countries such as France – and American communities such as Irvine, California – and outlaw glyphosate outright. Click here to sign the CalPIRG petition calling for a ban on glyphosate.

At the very least, CalPIRG asks that food tolerance levels for glyphosate be reconsidered – and that the EPA set limits for beer and wine (currently, safety limits for these beverages are non-existent. Also, items should be tested by the USDA for glyphosate before they appear in stores – not after the fact.

In addition, the report urged growers to stop spraying glyphosate on and near fields and between vines – and instead explore alternate methods of weed control, such as ground cover. To prevent cross-contamination of organic fields, there should be a wide buffer between these and neighboring conventional fields.

Health tip: If you still want to enjoy wine, but want a safer option, listen to Jonathan Landsman’s NaturalHealth365 podcast: “The Wine Industry Exposed.”

Continue to remind stores, breweries and vineyards in your area to look for sustainable ways to grow produce – and, as always, buy organic beers and wines. While not always free of glyphosate, these to contain much smaller amounts.

According to CalPIRG representative Laura Deehan, it is “incredibly difficult to avoid the troubling reality that consumers will likely drink glyphosate at every happy hour and backyard barbecue around the country.”

Glyphosate, warns Deehan, could prove a “true risk” to many Americans’ health.

It is up to us to try to stop the “horror show” of skyrocketing glyphosate use – and we can do so by working together to ensure that environmental agencies do their jobs – and that corporations such as Monsanto are held accountable for their actions.

Sources for this article include:

Sustainablepulse.com
Calpirg.org
NaturalHealth365.com

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Roundup ingredient found in Cheerios, Quaker Oats, and other cereals

Roundup ingredient found in Cheerios, Quaker Oats, and other cereals
By Editor August 16, 2018
http://www.theeventchronicle.com/editors-pick/roundup-ingredient-found-in-cheerios-quaker-oats-and-other-cereals/

Days after a California jury awarded a school groundskeeper more than $289 million in damages after he claimed Monsanto’s best-selling weedkiller Roundup gave him cancer, the controversial ingredient – glyphosate — has been detected in popular kids’ breakfast cereals, including Cheerios, Lucky Charms and Quaker Old Fashioned Oats, according to an activist group.

Lab tests conducted by the left-leaning Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit advocacy group that specializes in toxic chemicals and corporate accountability, indicated almost three-fourths of the 45 food products tested detected high levels of glyphosate, which has been identified as a “probable carcinogen” by the World Health Organization in 2015.

But makers of the foods EWG tested said they and their suppliers operate within U.S. government safety guidelines and dismissed the group’s findings as irrelevant.

However, many EWG scientists consider levels higher than 160 parts per billion of glyphosate above the safety threshold for children.

What’s more, about one-third of the 16 samples made with organically grown oats also had glyphosate, but at levels below EWG’s benchmark.

Popular children items, including General Mills’ Cheerios Toasted Whole Grain Oat Cereal, Lucky Charm’s, Kellogg’s Cracklin’ Oat Bran and Quaker’s Old Fashioned Oats, all had levels exceeding EWG’s safety guidelines.

But while those products exceeded the EWG’s threshold, they still fall within the EPA’s regulations, many food brands said.

In a statement to FOX Business regarding the report, a General Mills’ spokesperson says, “Our products are safe and without questions they meet regulatory safety levels.”

“The EPA has researched this issue and has set rules that we follow as do farmers who grow crops including wheat and oats. We continue to work closely with farmers, our suppliers and conservation organizations to minimize the use of pesticides on the crops and ingredients we use in our foods,” General Mills added.

Quaker also released a statement following the report, saying it does not add glyphosate during any part of the milling process,” and “glyphosate is commonly used by farmers across the industry who apply it pre-harvest.” Kellogg’s issued a similar statement, saying its food is safe and they follow the EPA’s strict standards for safely levels of these agricultural residues “and the ingredients we purchase from suppliers for our foods fall under these limits.”

The report come days after a jury at the Superior Court of California awarded $289 million in damages to Dewayne “Lee” Johnson, a San Francisco school groundskeeper that claimed Roundup caused him to developed non-Hodgkin lymphoma after using the spray for more than two years.

Jurors concluded that Monsanto’s Roundup and Ranger Pro products did present a “substantial danger” to Johnson and that the company, which is now owned by Bayer, knew or should have known about the potential risks of the products posed.

Johnson’s case is the first of a long list of about 4,000 people looking to sue the weed-and-seed maker for similar allegations.

Monsanto, however, says it plans to appeal the court’s decision and the verdict “does not change the fact that more than 800 scientific studies and reviews – and conclusions by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. National Institutes of Health and regulatory authorities around the world – support the fact that glyphosate does not cause cancer, and did not cause Mr. Johnson’s cancer.”

In response to EWG’s report, a Monsanto spokesperson said, “Even at the highest level reported by the EWG (1,300 ppb), an adult would have to eat 118 pounds of the food item every day for the rest of their life to reach the EPA’s limit.”

“Of course, nobody eats close to that much food! Using oatmeal as an example, 118 pounds would equal 228 servings or 3,658 percent of the daily recommended intake of fiber. These numbers translate to 9 ½ servings every hour without sleep for a person’s entire life,” Monsanto said.

Yet, Olga Naidenko, Ph.D., and senior science adviser for the EWG, says the bottom line is that glyphosate does not belong in children’s food and that recent biomonitoring studies show detectable levels of the ingredient in people’s urine, which likely comes from dietary exposure.

“And tests show that glyphosate levels in American’s bodies have been rising over time,” she says.

FDA found glyphosate in nearly all foods tested and hid the results


GMOs
FDA found glyphosate in nearly all foods tested and hid the results
By Editor June 14, 2018
http://www.theeventchronicle.com/gmo/fda-found-glyphosate-in-nearly-all-foods-tested-and-hid-the-results-2/
FDA found glyphosate in nearly all foods tested and hid the results
By Jonathan Landsman

In an alarming revelation, it has come to light that government scientists at U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have found the weed killer ingredient glyphosate in many popular processed foods. This information was in emails that were obtained through a freedom of information request. (what they did with that ‘intelligence’ is SHOCKING!)

Glyphosate is perhaps best known as the main ingredient in the Roundup weed killer brandfrom the Monsanto company. And, the FDA has been testing foods for the presence of herbicides and pesticides including, this highly toxic substance glyphosate for two years – but had not released results. (Gee, I wonder why)
Glyphosate has been used in weed killer for the past 40 years

The leaked information shows that the organization has had trouble finding foods that do NOT contain traces of this harmful chemical. Corn meal, crackers, cereals and many other processed foods all show traces of glyphosate.
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/apr/30/fda-weedkiller-glyphosate-in-food-internal-emails

The internal FDA email is dated January 2017 and is a portion of many communications within the organization to determine just how much glyphosate is in our nation’s food supply. It is the first time the FDA has attempted to ascertain the levels and potential risks of glyphosate contamination.

As you may know, glyphosate has been used for the past 40 years. Yet, the FDA just recently begun testing for it. (not a comforting thought – if you think about their slow reaction time)

Demand for testing intensified in 2015 following the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classification of glyphosate as a ‘probable human carcinogen.’
FDA claims pesticide testing was on samples that were “not official”

Roundup and other pesticide brands are sprayed directly on to many crops such as corn, wheat, oats and soybeans. It is also used on fields before growing season on crops like spinach and almonds.

While the levels are low, some exceed accepted guidelines, including in corn, where “over tolerance” levels were detected. (The legal limit is 5.0 ppm, and 6.5 ppm was detected.) Of course, the FDA dismissed its findings, along with other information in the email, stating that the foods tested were not “official samples.”

The FDA says it will be releasing official findings in a report later in 2018 or early 2019. These types of reports are typically released around two to two and a half years after data has been collected.

In addition to glyphosate, the FDA has also been measuring for herbicide residues 2,4-D and dicamba. There has been an increase in the use of these weed killers on genetically engineered crops.

And, now, (finally) the FDA says they have expanded testing capacity to assess for these chemicals. How many more people need to be poisoned by these chemicals before government ‘health’ agencies sound the alarm?!
Action step: Eating organic reduces your glyphosate exposure

While regulators, agrochemical industry interests and the Monsanto company all claim that traces of these chemicals are ‘perfectly safe,’ many scientists – and the evidence – say quite the opposite. (look up the work of MIT scientist, Stephanie Seneff, PhD)

Simply put, prolonged dietary exposure to pesticides can harm your health and has been linked to a higher risk of cancer and other chronic disease conditions like, autoimmune disorders. There’s no doubt, it’s the cumulative effect that causes so many problems.

Monsanto, often called “the most evil corporation” in the United States, has tried to block information regarding glyphosate food residue from being introduced as evidence in a court case regarding its Roundup products and their link with a higher risk of cancer. Fortunately, the San Francisco superior court judge denied has already denied such a motion.

So, what can you do? Avoiding processed foods sold in most supermarkets. Start spending your money on locally grown (chemical free) organic foods. Keep in mind, many local farmers markets don’t necessarily offer “certified organic” foods, but their non-toxic farming practices tend to offer much better produce – at very reasonable prices.

I have personally been blessed to (finally) meet an amazing couple of organic farmers – that supply almost 100% of my weekly produce needs. And, I hope to have more news about what they do (and how it can help you) in the near future.

Until then, shop wisely and stay well.

Sources for this article include:

TheGuardian.com
USRTK.org

Jonathan Landsman is the host of NaturalHealth365.com, the NaturalHealth365 Talk Hour – a free, weekly health show – and the NaturalHealth365 INNER CIRCLE, a monthly subscription to the brightest minds in natural health and healing.

Reaching hundreds of thousands of people, worldwide, as a personal health consultant, writer and radio talk show host, Jonathan has been educating the public on the health benefits of an organic, non-GMO diet along with high-quality supplementation and healthy lifestyle habits, including exercise and meditation.

This article (FDA found glyphosate in nearly all foods tested and hid the results) was originally published on Natural Health 365 and syndicated by The Event Chronicle. Via Prepare for Change.

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Monsanto Faces Blowback Over Cancer Cover-Up
A release of internal emails has revealed that U.S. agrochemical giant Monsanto manipulated studies of the company’s herbicide, Roundup. Experts believe the product causes cancer – and the consequences for the company could be dire.
© By Philip Bethge
Photo Gallery: Outrage over Monsanto Cancer ConnectionPhotos
STEVEN LÜDTKE / PICTURE ALLIANCE / DPA
http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/monsanto-papers-reveal-company-covered-up-cancer-concerns-a-1174233.html

October 24, 2017 10:31 AM Print FeedbackComment
Some companies’ reputations are so poor that the public already has low expectations when it comes to their ethics and business practices. That doesn’t make it any less shocking when the accusations against them are confirmed in black and white.

Agricultural chemicals giant Monsanto is under fire because the company’s herbicide, Roundup (active ingredient: glyphosate), is suspected of being carcinogenic. Permission to sell the chemical in the European Union expires on December 15 with member states set to decide on Wednesday whether to renew it for another 10 years. And now, the longstanding dispute about glyphosate has been brought to a head by the release of explosive documents.

Monsanto’s strategies for whitewashing glyphosate have been revealed in internal e-mails, presentations and memos. Even worse, these “Monsanto Papers” suggest that the company doesn’t even seem to know whether Roundup is harmless to people’s health.

“You cannot say that Roundup is not a carcinogen,” Monsanto toxicologist Donna Farmer wrote in one of the emails. “We have not done the necessary testing on the formulation to make that statement.”

The email, sent on Nov. 22, 2003, is one of more than 100 documents that a court in the United States ordered Monsanto to provide as evidence after about 2,000 plaintiffs demanded compensation from Monsanto in class-action suits. They claim that Roundup has caused non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a form of lymph node cancer, in them or members of their family.

The documents suggest the company concealed risks, making their publication a disaster for the company. The matter is also likely to be a topic of discussion at Bayer, the German chemical company in the process of acquiring Monsanto.

“The Monsanto Papers tell an alarming story of ghostwriting, scientific manipulation and the withholding of information,” says Michael Baum, a partner in the law firm of Baum, Hedlund, Aristei & Goldman, which is bringing one of the US class actions. According to Baum, Monsanto used the same strategies as the tobacco industry: “creating doubt, attacking people, doing ghostwriting.”

Glyphosate is the world’s most used herbicide. Companies like Monsanto, Syngenta and Bayer produce more than 800,000 metric tons of the subtance every year and sell it around the world. Farmers use the agent to clean the slate while preparing fields for the new sowing season, or spray it on potato or rapeseed fields to kill the plants just before maturity, making harvesting easier.

The popular agricultural chemical has been in use for more than 40 years and can now be found almost everywhere: in the urine of humans and animals, in milk, in beer, in ice cream, and above all in feed pellets from the United States and Brazil, which also end up being fed to German cattle and pigs.